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CaseyMeeks

I'm Casey, 23, NYC singer & actress, and this is the stuff I like.
Oct 21 '14
Oct 21 '14
mamalaz:

The most logical argument I’ve ever seen a hero use.

mamalaz:

The most logical argument I’ve ever seen a hero use.

Oct 21 '14

(Source: best-of-memes)

Oct 21 '14

alicesadventuresintherye:

Sometimes I’m Ernie. Sometimes I’m Bert.

(Source: loversdreamersandyou)

Oct 21 '14
thats-not-victorian:

The Best-Dressed Way to Say Goodbye

A show of mourning clothing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art reveals how high fashion dramatically presented itself at 19th-century funerals.
All-black attire hasn’t always been reserved for coffee shop poets and champagne-sipping fashionistas. Up until the turn of the 20th century, it was almost exclusively a sign of mourning: women publicly showing respect for the loss of a loved one.
But, somewhere between the fury of the industrial revolution and women’s liberation, the tradition itself died out, leaving only a brief implication that lingers in graveyards and funeral services with fleeting significance.
Now, the Metropolitan Museum of Art is revisiting the trend, taking visitors back to black with the debut of the Anna Wintour Costume Institute’s first fall exhibition in seven years. Death Becomes Her: A Century of Mourning Attire, which opens [Tuesday, October 21st], explores the custom of mourning dress from 1815 to 1915.
[Read more]

thats-not-victorian:

The Best-Dressed Way to Say Goodbye

A show of mourning clothing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art reveals how high fashion dramatically presented itself at 19th-century funerals.

All-black attire hasn’t always been reserved for coffee shop poets and champagne-sipping fashionistas. Up until the turn of the 20th century, it was almost exclusively a sign of mourning: women publicly showing respect for the loss of a loved one.

But, somewhere between the fury of the industrial revolution and women’s liberation, the tradition itself died out, leaving only a brief implication that lingers in graveyards and funeral services with fleeting significance.

Now, the Metropolitan Museum of Art is revisiting the trend, taking visitors back to black with the debut of the Anna Wintour Costume Institute’s first fall exhibition in seven years. Death Becomes Her: A Century of Mourning Attire, which opens [Tuesday, October 21st], explores the custom of mourning dress from 1815 to 1915.

[Read more]

Oct 21 '14

When a man cannot choose he ceases to be a man.

A Clockwork Orange (1971)

Oct 21 '14
picklesandwine:

Lord Dame Sir Andrew Lloyd Weber has such excite he has to make sure his topping hat is properly attached

picklesandwine:

Lord Dame Sir Andrew Lloyd Weber has such excite he has to make sure his topping hat is properly attached

Oct 21 '14

serk3t:

jbrclothing:

Cool Do’s

Amazing ladies with amazing hair

Oct 21 '14
Cotnoir we are in a fight

Cotnoir we are in a fight

Oct 21 '14

seenonlyfromadistance asked:

CASEY! I ALSO LOVE HOT FUZZ MORE THAN SHAUN OF THE DEAD!!! I think it's a much crisper, more on point movie. And it makes me laugh more. Aw man, just another thing we have in common. You're the best.

Hell yeah Hot Fuzz is the tops.